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Protect your building against damage from overflowing gutters with Gutter Grip®, a world patented gutter fixing system.

Gutter Grip® is a unique system that complies
with the strict Australian Standards and satisfies
the performance requirements of the Building and Plumbing Codes. Gutter Grip® can be used for
new or replacement gutters.
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Gutter Grip® Fact Sheet


  1. What is the appropriate legislation for gutters and downpipes?
  2. What are the codes and requirements for eaves gutters?
  3. What gutters require overflow methods?
  4. Who is responsible for ensuring that the gutter drainage system is designed and installed to comply?
  5. If I install a gutter system in accordance with manufactures installation instructions, will I be responsible if there is a problem with codes compliances?
  6. Can I rely on the Manufactures installation advice?
  7. Can I rely on the advice on NSW Fair Trading website?
  8. Can I rely on the Australian Steel Institute information sheet (design and installation of high front fascia guttering system)?
  9. Is it correct that if slotted gutter is used in gutter system, extra downpipes may be required to comply?
  10. What are appropriate overflow methods?
  11. Appropriate overflowing methods are to be full length (continuous) overflows for all gutters on a building.
  12. Is a 10mm gap at the back of the gutter between the gutter and fascia an appropriate overflow method?
  13. Is a 10mm gap the only method?
  14. Can I use an inverted downpipe as an overflow provision?
  15. Are cut down stop ends of the gutter a suitable overflow?
  16. Can I use rainhead with slots or inverted nozzles to comply with the appropriate overflow requirements?

  1. What is the appropriate legislation for gutters and downpipes?

    Gutter Grip® is compliant with The Plumbing Code of Australia (PCA) and The Building Code Australia (BCA).

  2. What are the codes and requirements for eaves gutters?

    Gutter installations are to be designed and installed to meet the performance requirements of the above codes, and ensure that water does not enter the building.

  3. What gutters require overflow methods?

    ALL Guttering installations must be designed and installed with appropriate overflow methods including low front gutters.

  4. Who is responsible for ensuring that the gutter drainage system is designed and installed to comply?

    The builder and/or roofing contractors/installers.

  5. If I install a gutter system in accordance with manufactures installation instructions, will I be responsible if there is a problem with codes compliances?

    Yes, the installer must ensure that the gutter is installed in a compliant manner.

  6. Can I rely on the Manufactures installation advice?

    Manufactures installation instructions are a general guide and installers must comply with the act. It is your responsibility to design and install guttering system to comply. View the Fair Trading Roof Plumbing PDF for more information.

  7. Can I rely on the advice on NSW Fair Trading website?

    Yes, NSW Fair Trading Roof Plumbing demonstrates how to design and install gutters, and shows examples of acceptable appropriate continuous overflow measures. Continuous overflow measures are required to meet the performance requirements of the The Plumbing Code of Australia (PCA) and The Building Code Australia (BCA).

  8. Can I rely on the Australian Steel Institute information sheet (design and installation of high front fascia guttering system)?

    No, information in this publication has been prepared for general information only, and does not in anyway constitute recommendation or professional advice.

  9. Is it correct that if slotted gutter is used in gutter system, extra downpipes may be required to comply?

    Yes, a slotted gutter has less effective (holding) capacity then unslotted gutter. As a result more downpipes are required to comply with the design requirements of the codes.

  10. What are appropriate overflow methods?

    Appropriate overflow methods are full length (continuous) overflows designed to prevent water entering the building from a 1 in 100 year storm event.

  11. Is a 10mm gap at the back of the gutter between the gutter and fascia an appropriate overflow method?

    Yes, it is one of the acceptable examples shown in the Australian Standards.

  12. Is a 10mm gap the only method?

    No, there are many options; however, the options must be full length (continuous).

  13. Do slots in gutter satisfy the overflow requirement?

    No, slots are not recognised by the BCA (Building Code of Australia) or Australian Standards as an appropriate overflow method.

  14. Can I use an inverted downpipe as an overflow provision?

    No, Australian Standards state that to comply there is to be no restriction to the free flow of Stormwater by protrusions or other obstructions.

  15. Are cut down stop ends of the gutter a suitable overflow?

    No, Standards require appropriate overflow to be full length (continuous) overflows.

  16. Can I use rainhead with slots or inverted nozzles to comply with the appropriate overflow requirements?

    No, Standards state if blockages occur, overtopping gutter would not be effected by an overflow device at the outlet such is a rainhead.

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